Language in Diversity

READING

  1. A.    Read the passages carefully and answer the questions below!

Thomas Alva Edison lit up the world with his invention of the electric light. Without him, the world might still be a dark place. However, the electric light was not his only invention. He also invented the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and over 1,200 other things. About every two weeks he created something new.

Thomas A. Edison was born in Milan, Ohio, on February 11, 1847. His family moved to Port Huron, Michigan, when he was seven years old. Surprisingly, he attended school for only two months. His mother, a former teacher, taught him a few things, but Thomas was mostly self-educated. His natural curiosity led him to start experimenting at a young age with electrical and mechanical things at home.

When he was 12 years old, he got his first job. He became a newsboy on a train that ran between Port Huron and Detroit. He set up a laboratory in a baggage care of the train so that he could continue his experiments in his spare time. Unfortunately, his first work experience did not end well. Thomas was fired when he accidentally set fire to the floor of the baggage car.

Thomas then worked for five years as a telegraph operator, but he continued to spend much of his time on the job conducting experiments. He got his first patent in 1868 for a vote recorder run by electricity. However, the vote recorder was not a success. In 1870, he sold another invention, a stock-ticker, for $40,000. A stock-ticker is a machine that automatically prints stock prices on a tape. He was then able to build his first shop in Newark, New Jersey.

Thomas Edison was totally deaf in one ear and hard of hearing in the other, but thought of his deafness as a blessing in many ways. It kept conversations short, so that he could have more time for work. He called himself a “two-shift man” because he worked 16 out of every 24 hours. Sometimes he worked so intensely that his wife had to remind him to sleep and eat.

Thomas Edison died at the age of 84 on October 18, 1931, at his estate in West Orange, New Jersey. He left numerous inventions that improved the quality of life all over the world.

Choose on the answer you think is correct.

1. Thomas Edison did things in this order:

a. he became a telegraph operator, a newsboy, and then got his first patent

b. he became a newsboy, got his first patent, and then became a telegraph operator

c. he got a patent, became a telegraph operator, and then became a newsboy

d. he became a newsboy, a telegraph operator, and then got a patent

2. Edison considered his deafness:

a. a disadvantage

b. a blessing

c. something from a priest

d. a necessity

3. Of all the inventions, __________ was probably the most important for civilization.

a. the vote recorder

b. the stock ticker

c. the light bulb

d. the motion picture camera

4. The main idea of this passage is:

a. Thomas Edison was always interested in science and inventions, and he invented many important things.

b. Thomas Edison could not keep a job.

c. Thomas Edison worked day and night on his experiments.

d. Deaf people make good inventors because they can focus without the distraction of spoken conversation.

5. His mother, a former teacher, taught him a few things, but he was mostly self-educated.

a. taught himself

b. born a genius

c. loved school

d. thought of himself

6. The sentence “His family moved to Port Huron, Michigan, when he was seven years old” is an expression of

a. conditional sentence (unreal in the past)              c. two events concept

b. expectation                                                           d. conditional sentence (real)

7. The phrase “for only two months” explains

a. when an event happens                                        c. how long an event happens

b. two events concept                                              d. where an event happens

8. the sentence “His mother, a former teacher, taught him a few things, but Thomas was mostly self-educated” is a kind of

a. imperative sentence                                              c. elliptical structure

b. declarative sentence                                             d. participle

9. the sentence “A stock-ticker is a machine that automatically prints stock prices on a tape” is kind of

a. adverbial clause b. adjective clause                     c. noun clause              d. non clause 10. “ He was then able to build his first shop in Newark”, the word be able to is    expression of

a. expectation              b. whishes                   c. ability                      d. suggestion

11. “Sometimes he worked so intensely that his wife had to remind him to sleep and eat” the underline sentence is kind of

a. adverbial clause                b. adjective clause       c. noun clause              d. non clause

 

Choose on the word or phrase that means the same as the underlined word or phrase.

11. His natural curiosity soon led him to start experimenting with electrical and mechanical things at home.

a. experiencing

b. inventing

c. making tests and playing with

d. ignoring

12. He left numerous inventions that improved the quality of life all over the world.

a. numbered

b. many

c. none

d. modern

13. Sometimes he worked so intensely that his wife had to remind him to sleep and eat.

a. passionately and with great focus

b. carelessly and with many distractions

c. hard

d. problems

Sophia Fowler Gallaudet was the deaf wife of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, who founded the first permanent public school for the deaf in Hartford, Connecticut. She did not allow her deafness to prevent her from leading a full life. She was educated, raised a family, ran a busy household, and helped to found Gallaudet College.

Sophia Fowler was born deaf near Guilford, Connecticut, on March 20, 1798. At that time, there were no schools for the deaf in America. However, Sophia had a good mind. She used her intellect and learned many skills by watching the people around her. She learned to cook and sew, and became a modest, gay and charming young lady.

Sophia was nineteen years old when her parents learned that a school for the deaf had been founded in Hartford, Connecticut. She entered the school in 1817 and stayed there until the spring of 1821. While she was there, the principal of the school, Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet fell in love with her and asked her to marry him. Sophia did not hesitate, and married him in 1821.

As Mrs. Gallaudet, she continued to charm the people she met. She was eager to learn from every social situation. Through her contact with the many visitors to her home, she was actually able to continue her education.

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet died in 1851, leaving his wife to make a life without him and he couldn’t come anymore. However, her eight children did not leave her without support. With the help of her grown children, she continued to keep house for those children that had not yet married.

In 1857, Mrs. Gallaudet’s youngest son, Edward Miner Gallaudet, became principal of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf in Washington D.C. He was only 20 years only at the time, but his ambition was to establish a college for the deaf. His mother shared his dream and work. She used to met with members of Congress and other prominent men in order to gain support for her goals. Through them, she helped to obtain funds to found and maintain Gallaudet College.

Mrs. Gallaudet served as matron of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf (now Kendall Demonstration School and Gallaudet College) for nine years. This included two years as head of the department that taught many of the household skills that she had learned as a child, such as cooking and sewing. She retired only when her health began to fail.

During her last years, Mrs. Gallaudet spent the winters in Washington, D.C., and the rest of the year traveling and visiting her children and grandchildren. She died on May 13, 1877. Gallaudet had preserved her memory by naming Fowler Hall, which was originally a women’s dormitory and is now part of the graduate school, in her honor.

14. According to the story, Sophia continued her education after she finished school by:

a. reading books

b. meeting and interacting with people

c. being at Gallaudet College

d. learning from Thomas Gallaudet

15. After her husband died, she finished raising her children, and then she:

a. moved to Washington, D.C.

b. spent her winters in Washington and the rest of the year visiting her children and grandchildren.

c. became sick.

d. Helped her son to establish a college for the deaf.

16. Sophia studied at the school for the deaf in Hartford, Connecticut:

a. for ten years

b. from 1817 to 1851

c. from 1817 to 1821

d. From 1798 to 1803

17. We can assume from this passage that:

a. Sophia believed that deaf people should have equal rights to education and employment.

b. Sophia thought that deaf people were better off living with a relative who could take care of them and support them.

c. Sophia wished that she could have visited deaf schools in Europe.

d. Sophia always wanted a dormitory to be named after her.

18. “She used her intellect and learned many skills by watching the people around her”, the underline word is

a. Past participle                   b. participle                 c. verbal noun              d. gerund

19. “While she was there, the principal of the school, Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet fell in love with her” what kind of two event concept, the underline sentence above

a. bersamaan                         b. memotong               c. berurutan                 d. terpisah

20. “She did not allow her deafness to prevent her from leading a full life” is an expression of

a. ability                               b. necessity                  c. expectation              d. permission

21. “He left his wife to make a life without him and he couldn’t come anymore”, the underline sentence is an expression of

a. ability                               b. impossibility            c. expectation              d. permission

22. .”She used to met with members of Congress and other prominent men in order to gain support for her goals” is an expression of

a. ability                   b. conditional sentence           c. habitual action         d. permission

23. The phrase “During her last years” explains

a. when an event happens                                        c. how long an event happens

b. two events concept                                              d. where an event happens

 

Choose on the word or phrase that means the same as the underlined word or phrase.

24. Sophia Fowler Gallaudet was the deaf wife of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet who founded the first permanent public school for the deaf.

a. temporary                         b. residential                c. lasting                      d. important

25. She became a modest, gay, and charming young lady.

a. humble                  b. modern                    c. cheerful                   d. arrogant

26. Sophia didn’t hesitate, and married him in 1821.

a. plan                       b. want to                    c. take a long time to decide   d. confide

27. She often met with members of Congress and other prominent men in order to gain support for her goals.

a. government                      b. promising     c. not famous                   d. famous and important

28. She helped to obtain funds to found and maintain Gallaudet College.

a. get                                    b. order                        c. observe                    d. send

29. Gallaudet has preserved her memory by naming Fowler Hall in her honor.

a. encouraged                       b. promised                 c. kept alive                 d. ignored

30. Sophia was nineteen years old when her parents learned that a school for the deaf had been founded in Hartford, Connecticut.

a. located                  b. established              c. lost               d. discovered

 

Most people don’t know the true story of the little boy who came to be known as Douglas Craig. He was found wandering around the streets of Washington, D.C. He could not hear or speak. He did not know his name or how old he was. He had no home. At night, he huddled in doorways and slept. Sometimes people pitied him and gave him food and clothing. If not, he ate what he could find in garbage cans.

It is said that a man named Craig found the little boy and took him to Dr. E. M. Gallaudet at Gallaudet College. Dr. Gallaudet gave him the first name of Douglas, and the last name of Craig, after the man found him. The little boy became Douglas Craig.

Dr. Gallaudet placed Douglas in the Kendall School, and he stayed there until he was old enough to work. He spent his life working in and around the halls of Gallaudet. Consequently, all of the students who lived on Kendall Green during the days of Douglas Craig must have knowen him. They had told enough stories about him to fill a book.

Douglas grew to become a tall, strong man. He was probably the best “handy man” that Gallaudet had ever had. He had many duties, such as picking up mail at the post office, mowing grass, raking leaves, tending the flower beds, raising and lowering the heavy drop curtain on the stage for plays in the chapel, and carrying notes from the boys to the girls. Clearly, he was a familiar sight on campus.

For years, Douglas lived in a room over the stable which once stood near the Ely Center. He liked to collect junk, and the stable loft was full of old tin bath tubs, bed springs, clothes, and stove pipe hats that other people had given to him. He once raised rabbits, guinea pigs, and white rats in the stable yard.

Douglas actively sought a wife during his life at Gallaudet. It is said that he asked all of the black cooks in the college kitchen to marry him. For a time, he courted a black woman from Baltimore. Since his courtship required letter-writing, and he was illiterate, he had a student in the college act as his “private secretary.” Though that relationship did not work out, he did finally marry. Later in life, he married a black deaf woman from Washington. The wedding and reception took place in a church near the college, and most of the college faculty and teachers of the Kendall School were present. Douglas was dressed for the occasion in a full-dress suit with a white tie and white gloves.

The happy couple went to Baltimore for a honeymoon, but the honeymoon only lasted for one day. Their plans were cut short when Douglas’ pocketbook containing about $300 was either lost or stolen.

Douglas never got very far from Washington, D.C. Gallaudet College was his world. He went to Norfolk, Virginia, once on a vacation, but he did not know what a vacation was. He spent the entire time working around the docks of Norfolk. He came home with a pocketful of money, and told everyone that he had a fine vacation.

Douglas’ last public duty was to raise the flag to the top of the new flagpole in front of College Hall. He was very feeble at the time, and sat in a big armchair during the ceremonies. He died on February 11, 1936, but left a legend at Gallaudet that would live forever.

 

Choose on the answer you think is correct.

31. The main idea of the story is that:

a. Craig liked women.

b. Gallaudet is the best place for an orphan to grow up.

c. Craig was an orphan, and no one ever found out exactly what happened to his family.

d. Craig, a man with an unusual background, worked at Gallaudet for many years.

32. It is most likely that Douglas Craig enjoyed working at Gallaudet because:

a. Gallaudet was a good place to collect junk.

b. he found it easy to communicate with people.

c. people felt sorry for him so he didn’t have to work hard.

d. he didn’t have a home.

33. “He did not know what a vacation was.” This phrase means:

a. he did not know what the word “vacation” meant.

b. he could not stop working even on a vacation.

c. he hated vacations.

d. he never took time off from work.

34. Craig and his new wife’s honeymoon did not last long because:

a. their money was lost or stolen.

b. Craig missed Gallaudet and wanted to come back early.

c. they spent all their money.

d. their baggage and clothing was lost or stolen.

35. the sentence “how old he was” is kind of

a. elliptical structure             b. exclamatory sentence          c. participle      d. gerund

36. They had told …………

a. story enough                     b. too story                  c. enough story            d. so story

37. the pattern of “Since his courtship required letter-writing, and he was illiterate, he had a student in the college act” is

a. since + s. future + pr. Con.                                   c. since + s. past + past perfect

b. since + s. past + present  perfect                          d. since + s. past + s. future

38. “If not, he ate what he could find in garbage cans”. The underline word is the same meaning with

a. although                           b. despite                     c. or else                      d. enough

 

Choose on the word or phrase that means the same as the underlined word or phrase.

39. At nights, he huddled in doorways and slept.

a. hid                        b. curled up                 c. snuck in                   d. knocked

40. Needless to say, he was a familiar sight on campus.

a. common, easily recognizable        b. strange         c. friendly        d. daily, repeated

41. His courtship required letter-writing, therefore, he asked a student in the college to be his private secretary since he was illiterate.

a. afraid                    b. too busy                  c. unable to read and write                 d. lazy

42. Douglas actively sought a wife during his life at Gallaudet.

a. tried to find                      b. abandoned              c. fought                      d. needed

43. He spent the entire time working around the docks of Norfolk.

a. half                       b. tiring                                    c. whole                       d. slow

44. He was very feeble at the time, and sat in a big armchair during the ceremonies.

a. loyal                      b. proud                                   c. strong                      d. weak

45. He died on February 11, 1936, but he left a legend that would live forever.

a. a story that is passed on from the past

b. a lie that no one believes

c. history in print

d. stories for everyone

 

  1. B.     Read the questions below carefully and answer them well

Make an expression with the following word

  1. Possibility (have + very rich)
  2. Impossibility (eat + hungry)
  3. Wishes (not rain + because + go on picnic)
  4. Ability (since + child + run)
  5. Necessity (not accuse + in order that + save)
  6. Prohibition (swim + so dangerous)
  7. Advisability (work harder + earn)
  8. Suggestion (ask + help + try)
  9. Expectation (beautiful + abash)
  10. Habitual action in the past (go abroad)
  11. Habitual action in the present (convince)
  12. Preference (climb mountain + cave)
  13. Request (complain) “make in formal speaking)
  14. Permission (take a day off + want)
  15. Indirect speech from “let’s”
  16. Indirect speech from “imperative”

Change the statements below into the same meaning

  1. It’s alleged that the strike was held on Sunday
  2. Marry is said to be 108 years old
  3. It’s expected that the star ship will fall down
  4. Logan was understood to be stupid girl

Make an example of the words written below

  1. Although and despite
  2. Enough and too
  3. Another, other, the other, others and the others
  4. Anymore, again, no more and no longer
  5. Conditional sentence

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